Bootle Hens


 

 

EGG RECIPES, TIPS AND FACTS

 

I COULDN'T HAVE A WEBSITE ABOUT CHICKENS AND EGGS AND NOT HAVE SOME EGG RECIPES, TIPS AND FACTS. APOLOGIES IF YOU FIND IT AN INSULT TO YOUR INTELLIGENCE OR IF YOU FIND IT A BIT BASIC - AFTER ALL I DON'T WANT TO TRY AND TEACH MY GRANNY HOW TO SUCK EGGS...

 

BOILED EGGS

PUT EGGS IN PAN. COVER EGGS WITH COLD WATER. HEAT UNTIL SIMMERING (BUBBLING) THEN SIMMER:

2 MINUTES 40 SECS FOR SOFT BOILED

10 MINUTES FOR HARD BOILED

2 MINUTES FOR 'SNOTTY' (BARELY COOKED - NOT WISE REALLY)

THESE ARE ROUGH GUIDES. TIMES VARY ACCORDING TO YOUR COOKER AND PAN.

 

SCRAMBLED EGGS

SERVES 1

2 OR 3 EGGS WHISKED IN A JUG, ADD A PINCH OF SALT AND A SPLASH OF EITHER WATER OR MILK

MICROWAVE ON FULL POWER FOR 1 MINUTE, TAKE OUT AND MASH UP

BACK IN MICROWAVE, 10 SECS ON FULL POWER, TAKE OUT AND MASH UP AGAIN.

REPEAT UNTIL YOU ARE SATISFIED

ADD BITS OF HAM TO MAKE IT A TAD MORE INTERESTING. GARNISH WITH PARSLEY IF YOU WANT TO LOOK A BIT MORE LIKE A PRO

 

OMELETTE

ADD 2/3 EGGS TO A JUG. WHISK. HEAT SOME OIL IN A FRYING PAN. CHOP SOME MUSHROOMS, GRATE SOME CHEESE. POUR WHISKED EGG IN TO PAN. HEAT GENTLY UNTIL MIX STARTS TO THICKEN. ON ONE SIDE ADD YOUR CHEESE AND MUSHROOMS. ONCE THE MIX IS MORE RUBBERY FLIP ONE SIDE OVER ON TO THE CHEESE AND MUSHROOMS. HEAT A LITTLE LONGER (UNTIL CHEESE HAS MELTED) THEN SERVE WITH BEANS. NICE, QUICK MEAL.

 

GYPSY TOAST - AKA EGGY BREAD

WHISK AN EGG. USE IT TO SOAK A PIECE OF BREAD. ONCE ABSORBED - FRY IT. APPARENTLY ITS NICE BUT I HAVEN'T TRIED IT YET. ONCE I HAVE I SHALL REVEAL ALL ON THE NEWS PAGE. THANKS TO MARTIN BURDON FOR TELLING ME ABOUT THIS.

 

POACHED

NOT SURE ABOUT THIS YET! YOU COULD ALWAYS GET ONE OF THEM MICROWAVE EGG POACHERS!

MICROWAVE RECIPES

Fried Eggs

Break and slip 1 egg into each of 2 lightly greased 10-ounce custard cups or a pie plate. Gently prick yolks with tip of knife or wooden pick. Cover with plastic wrap. Cook on 50% power just until eggs are almost desired doneness, about 2 to 3 minutes. Let stand, covered until whites are completely set and yolks begin to thicken but are not hard.

Hard-Cooked Eggs

Separate yolks and whites of eggs into 2 lightly greased liquid measures or small bowls. Stir yolks with fork. Cover each container with plastic wrap. Cook separately on 50% or 30% power, stirring once or twice, allowing about 20 to 30 seconds per yolk, about 30 seconds to 1 minute per white. Remove when slightly underdone. Let stand, covered, about 2 minutes. Cool long enough to handle comfortably, then chop or chill until ready to chop.

Poached Eggs

Pour 1/3 cup water into 10-ounce custard cup or small deep bowl. Break and slip in 2 eggs. Gently prick yolks with tip of knife or wooden pick. Cover with plastic wrap. Cook on full power about 1 1/2 to 2 minutes. If necessary, let stand, covered, until whites are completely set and yolks begin to thicken but are not hard, about 1 to 2 minutes. Pour off water to serve in custard cup or lift out with slotted spoon.  NOTE: For 4 eggs, use 2/3 cup water in 1-quart bowl or baking dish. Cook 1 1/2 to 3 minutes and let stand as above.

Scrambled Eggs

In 10-ounce custard cup, beat together 2 eggs, and 2 tablespoons milk with salt and pepper to taste, if desired, until blended. Cook on full power, stirring once or twice, until almost set, about 1 to 1 1/2 minutes. Stir. If necessary, cover with plastic wrap and let stand until eggs are thickened and no visible liquid egg remains, about 1 minute.  NOTE: All microwave cooking times are based on a full power output of 600 to 700 watts. For a lower wattage oven, allow more time.

 

TIPS/FACTS

EGGS SHOULD BE CONSUMED WITHIN 21 DAYS OF BEING LAID

IT TAKES 21 DAYS FOR AN EGG TO INCUBATE

A FRESH EGG SHOULD SINK IF PUT INTO A BOWL OF WATER, A BAD ONE WILL FLOAT

TRY CRUSHING AN EGG BETWEEN FINGER AND THUMB - TOP AND BOTTOM OF THE EGG. DON'T TRY IT IN A VICE!

THIS IS PURELY MY OPINION BUT MY BELIEF ON THE OLD, OLD QUESTION WHICH CAME FIRST THE CHICKEN OR THE EGG? SCIENTIFICALLY SPEAKING (SCIENCE IS USUALLY ALWAYS THE ANSWER IF YOUR A REALIST) CHICKENS DERIVED FROM DINOSAURS SO THE EGG CAME FIRST. ITS HARD TO ARGUE WITH THAT.

EGG NUTRITION

A nutritious substance, many of which are supplied by the egg. While no one food (other than mother's milk, perhaps) provides everything that humans need, the egg contains a wide array of necessary nutrients. It was, after all, made to supply everything for the creation and nourishment of a baby chick.

Egg protein is of such high quality that it is often used as the standard by which other protein is measured. Egg protein contains all the essential amino acids (building blocks of protein which the body needs but cannot make) in a pattern that matches very closely the pattern the body needs.

That is why eggs are classified with meat in the food groups and why egg protein is called complete protein.

A moderate amount of fat, about 5 grams, is found in a Large egg yolk. About 1.5 grams are saturated and 2.5 grams unsaturated.

An egg contains varying amounts of 13 vitamins (but no vitamin C) plus many minerals. An egg yolk is one of the few foods which contain vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin.

As is true for most foods, some minor nutrient losses do occur in the egg after cooking. Of the nutrients in an egg, riboflavin, thiamin and folic acid are generally less heat stable than other nutrients. Normal cooking simply changes the form of egg protein but it is still just as nutritious. Protein is destroyed only when it is severely overcooked such as in the brown lacy edges or an overcooked fried egg. You can preserve the highest nutrient content possible by avoiding overcooking.

A measurement of protein quality expressing the rate of efficiency with which protein is used for growth.

Egg contains the highest quality food protein known. It is so nearly perfect, in fact, that egg protein is often the standard by which all other proteins are judged. Based on the essential amino acids it provides, egg protein  is second only to mother's milk for human nutrition. On a scale with 100 representing top efficiency, these are the biological values of proteins in several foods.* -see Nutrient, Protein

Whole egg 93.7
Milk 84.5
Fish 76.0
Beef 74.3
Soybeans 72.8
Rice, polished 64.0
Wheat, whole 64.0
Corn 60.0
Beans, dry 58.0

CALORIES

The calorie count for eggs varies with size. Here is the calorie score for one egg in different sizes. ~see Nutrient, Reference Daily Intakes (RDI)

EGG SIZE CALORIES
Medium 66
Large 75
Extra Large 84
Jumbo 94

 

 

COOKING METHODS

  There are five basic methods for cooking eggs.

  The basic principle of egg cooking is to use a medium to low temperature and time carefully. When eggs are cooked at too high a temperature or for too long at a low temperature, whites shrink and become tough and rubbery; yolks become tough and their surface may turn gray-green.

Eggs, other than hard-cooked, should be cooked until the whites are completely coagulated and the yolks begin to thicken.

COOKING EQUIPMENT ESPECIALLY FOR EGGS

Egg cooking can be as simple as you want it to be. If you enjoy fancying up things a bit, there are several pieces of equipment and specialty gadgets you may find interesting.

Coddler
A small cup made of porcelain, heat-proof glass or pottery with a screw-on top. An egg is broken into the cup, the top screwed on and the cup submerged in simmering water until the egg is cooked. The egg is eaten directly from the coddler.

Cooker
An electric appliance which steam-cooks eggs in the shell. Most egg cookers also have inserts or cups for steam-poaching. Some also have a flat insert for cooking omelets, fried eggs or scrambled eggs.

Crepe Pan
A shallow, slope-sided skillet, 6 to 8 inches in diameter. These range from inexpensive, lightweight pans to sophisticated electric models, some of which cook the crepes on what appears to be the outside of the pan. Crepes can be made in almost any small shallow pan with sloping sides. A small omelet pan will do a nice double-duty job.

Cup
A small container designed to hold a soft-cooked egg upright in its shell for table service.

Custard Cups
Small, deep, individual bowl-shaped dishes designed for oven use. They are useful for cooking or serving other foods as well as custards.

Omelet Pan
A shallow, slope-sided skillet, usually 7 to 10 inches in diameter. A double omelet pan consists of 2 shallow rectangular or semicircular pans attached by hinges. Each pan has a handle. Some purists insist that an omelet pan should be well seasoned, never washed with detergent and used only for omelets. More practical cooks insist that a slope-sided pan with a nonstick coating is fine for omelets and for sauteing, frying, and other purposes.

Piercer
A sharp-pointed tool for gently pricking a very small hole in the large end of an eggshell before hard-cooking. A clean, preferably sterilized, thumbtack, pin or needle can also be used for piercing. Piercing may allow some air to escape and some water to seep into the egg during cooking which may make peeling easier. Piercing also often produces hairline cracks in the shell.


Poacher
A rack that holds 1-egg-sized cups over simmering water, or a small colander-like form that holds an egg as it poaches in simmering water.

Quiche Dish
A round, shallow, straight-sided ceramic or porcelain dish, usually with scalloped edges, for use in the oven. Sometimes it is also called a flan or tart dish and is available in several sizes. A pie plate or pan of the same size will substitute nicely.

Ring
A round band, with or without a handle, to hold a fried or poached egg during cooking.
Scissors
A circular gadget for opening soft-cooked eggs. When its scissors-type handle is operated, a series of teeth or a blade clips off the top of the egg.

Separator
A small cup centered in a round frame made of plastic, metal or ceramic. The cup catches the yolk while slots around the frame let the white slip through to a container beneath.

Slicer
A device which cuts a hardcooked egg into neat slices with one swift stroke. It has an indented tray in which the egg rests and a cutting mechanism of parallel wires. To chop an egg, carefully reverse the sliced egg in the tray and cut through again.


Souffle Dish
A deep, straight-sided dish designed for oven use. It may also serve as a casserole dish. Souffle dishes are available in different sizes. A straight-sided casserole, uncoated saucepan or baking dish of the same size can be substituted.

Wedger Wedger
Similar to a slicer, it cuts the egg into 6 equal parts rather than into slices. The wedger holds the egg upright as wires are pulled over to cut the wedges. When the wires are drawn down only partway, the egg can be opened to hold a stuffing or to resemble a flower.

 

 

EGG COMPOSITION:

 

Big Egg Picture